All posts by bernardhoyes

Visual Art Master Bernard Stanley Hoyes About Bernard Hoyes Born in Kingston, Jamaica, Hoyes demonstrated artistic abilities early on. When he was trotted off to live with a great aunt in rural Jamaica, his exposure to revival cults, ceremonies and rituals planted seeds deep within that would manifest as art in his later years. Hoyes's formal art studies began at Junior Art Centre at the Institute of Jamaica. At age 15 he left Jamaica for New York City. His lessons continued at the Art Students League and Vermont Academy. A heady combination of his drive to excel and the influence of the civil rights movement placed Hoyes at the helm of propelling the Academy to institute social and cultural programs. Upon graduation he was the first recipient of the Frederick Stanley Art Award and saw the launching of the school's first formal arts department. When Hoyes attended an alumnus reception some years later, to receive the Florence Sabin Distinguished Alumni Award, he felt pride in seeing the new edifice housing a formal art department. He earned a Bachelor in Fine Arts in painting and graphic design from the California School of Arts and Crafts in Oakland. . During the 70’s he, worked intensively on his “Rag Series” which symbolize, document and prophesied his journey from a struggling artist to one of prominence. In the early 80’s he began works that recall his Afro-Caribbean roots, specifically the rituals of African Spirituality and Christianity, since the Middle Passage. In this body of work, there is a heavy emphasis on the roles and power of woman, especially in the realms of music, dance and magic. Hoyes has participated in numerous solo exhibitions here and abroad. He has created murals in the inner city of Los Angeles, Ca. He has curated exhibitions and held a position on the board at the Museum of African American in Los Angeles. Won awards of Excellence for his famous “Revival Series,” nationally and internationally. His works have been featured in numerous television and film productions, and collected internationally. His recognition and affirmation of traditional African religion and spirituality continues to find universal appeal, stunning audiences worldwide as evidenced by his "2009 Fall Tour - Europe." Oprah Winfrey, Natalie Cole, Steve Harvey, Keenan Ivory Wayans and the National Urban League are among his collectors. President Barack Obama has even been photographed in front of his work. His craft has been fêted internationally in galleries around the world. In 1997 he mounted a, 25-year Review at the Museum of African American Art and the Los Angeles Watts Towers Exhibition Center. Founded Caribbean Arts, Inc. in 1982 to publish and distribute his Fine Art prints. Still acting on the creative impulse, he has a Sculpture garden in progress on a 3 acre Mesa in Desert Hot Springs, Ca. Hoyes has developed a non-toxic etching process using an Electrolyte process and have pulled a collection of etchings since 1996. In the summer of 2006 he introduced Kensington Press Revival to the Arts community in Kingston, Jamaica. An Atelier for Printmaking, that shares Electrolyte etching with local artist. Hoyes held a 25 review of the Revival Series entitled ”Lamentation and Celebrations” at the Loves Jazz and Art Center in Omaha, NE. in 2007. His sojourn to China to live and work with Stonemasons to create the Blue Fin Tuna Commission is well documented. In 2009, he completed a three City Exhibition Tour of Europe that included an Artist residency in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Most recently Hoyes' work was on display as part of the "Places of Validation, Art & Progression" exhibit organized by the California African American Museum as part of the Getty initiative "Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980" exhibitions; and he is featured in Lyn Kienholz's coffee table New Art Encyclopedia pictorial, "L.A. Rising: SoCal Artist before 1980" also supported by the Getty Foundation. In 2012, “Se7en Paintings, a Story in Performance”, was Staged. Choreographed dance, music, theatre Video and Visual Arts each riffing on the other, weave together a tale rooted in Jamaica’s spiritual traditions. Seven of Hoyes Iconic Paintings came to life on the Ford Theatre Stage in Los Angeles."Seven Paintings" is sure to elevate, inspire and revolutionize the way we view art in the future. And to experience the work of Bernard Hoyes' beyond seven paintings, go to http:// www.BernardHoyes.com.

“RAGS IN THE SANDS OF TIME” The Evolving Rag Series

Syncona Skies
BERNARD STANLEY HOYES                 “Syncona Skies, mixed Medium 30×40”

Rags on Earth

The opening of a new show this season in Palm Desert introduced the Art Public to Bernard Stanley Hoyes’s Rag series. In contex that has the earth, the dirt, the grains of Sands combined with the textures of the Rags in concert.  Tones of browns and beiges are highlighted to values that relies on the natural realm.

 

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“Rags in Sand” mixed medium on Canvas, 30×40″

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Lairs, Den, and Burrows
BERNARD  HOYES “Lairs Den and Burrows” Mixed Medium 38×46″

Since 1992, Hoyes adopted the Etching medium as a means of expression, for its details, its intimacy and craftsmanship. The deliberate implied rhythmic lines and tonal gestures of The Revival Series (for which he is well known) have found new life.

The mediums fluidity, intimate scale, and delicate calligraphic lines has becomes a personal kind of gesture, like a private note or letter evoking different emotional textures. A body of work like the Rag Series, with its imperfect lines with rich textures and nuanced tonalities, has found new terrain. http://www.Bernardhoyes.com.

“My Artistic concerns has been with spiritual testimonies, using Contemporary expressions as the driving force to established a Visual Voice. Speaking and Calling to our inner spirit, beckoning into worlds and regions of  sacredness and sanctified offerings in search of the life force. My new works have gotten transformative.”

“Se7en Paintings a Story in Performance” An Interdisciplinary  Performance at the FORD

Proof being, bringing a selection of the Revival Series Paintings to life, to tell a Story on Stage. An Interdisciplinary creative force, using Visual Arts, Video, Dance, African Drums and Voices. The production titled, “Se7en Paintings, a Story in Performance”, premiered at the Ford Amphitheater Stage in Los Angeles in 2012.

A unified science of all my art that went before, including neglected concepts and synthesis of varied medium, as expressed in the multidisciplinary “Seven Paintings”. This Art Performance is sure to elevate, inspire and revolutionize the way we view art in the future. To experience the work of Bernard Stanley Hoyes’ beyond seven paintings, go to http://www.bernardhoyes.com.

THE RAG SERIES
Unique Contemporary Graphics by Bernard Stanley Hoyes. Rag impressions reflect ancestral connections to contemporary life. Done in a spontaneous technique. A rag laden with ink is cast onto paper as a fisherman would cast his net in the sea. When lifted a print remains suggesting and delineating forms, mass and movement. Details added by the artist free the images into compositions with vitality and power

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“Rags on my Horizon, a Civilization in my Past” mixed medium on paper, 24×36

New insights in my application of the Painting discipline have since emerged as a result. There  are   a  few  from  the  Rag  series,  which  are  well  known.  “Where  she  found  her  wings”  “Rag  Nouveau”  and  “Rag  in  Vogue”  All  inspired  by  the  notion  of  having  arrived,  irregardless of  how  we  got  there,  Ragged,  but  aspiring  in  style. A Modernist discourse has evolved. Raw Materials, technology, and raw textures have appeared. Templates harkening back to the Rag Series of the Seventies, when Raw materials and graphics were prevalent in my Artistic exploration.”

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Bernard Stanley Hoyes “Fortune’s Bride (Rags) mixed Medium 38×60”

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BERNARD STANLEY HOYES “In a Rag Mood” mixed medium on Canvas, 30×40

 

Bridging Communities Photography Project Palm Springs Black History CommitteeCity of Palm SpringsPalm Springs Art Museum February 14, 2016 Congresswoman Waters Opening  Remarks.

Bridging Communities Photography Project

Palm Springs Black History Committee

City of Palm Springs

Palm Springs Art Museum

 

February 14, 2016

 

Congresswoman Waters Opening Remarks

 

Good evening, and thank you Ms. Jherveri (JAH-VER-EE) for the kind introduction! I was delighted when the Palm Springs Black History Committee invited me to spend Valentines Day here with such a talented, creative, and energizing group. When Bernard Hoyes told me about this event just a few months ago, I knew that it was something that I could not miss.

 

I would like to start by thanking the Black History Committee, the City of Palm Springs, and the Palm Springs Art Museum for collaborating and coming together to host the Bridging Communities Photography Project. I can think of no better way to celebrate Black History Month than by bringing together the two most important aspects of our community and culture: youth and the arts, together in such a beautiful space. The Palm Springs Art Museum truly is one of this City’s precious treasures.

 

And of course, I’d like to give special recognition to two renowned photographers, the late Mr. Donald Cravens and Mr. Alfonso Murray. Mr. Cravens, whose works are currently on display, spent his life showcasing a critical piece of America’s history. He single-handedly escalated the progress of the civil rights movement with iconic photographs that captured moments like Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her sit on a segregated bus. It is also a pleasure to mention Mr. Murray, with us here today, who too has depicted such moving stories in each and every one of his photographs, particularly of the many civil rights demonstrations he has photographed in our modern day.

 

Please give him a round of applause.

 

The Bridging Communities Photography Project brings us all together to evaluate and ask ourselves, “Are we making progress?” “Have we succeeded?” Without a doubt, this is a critical time for the African-American community as we reflect on our progress this month- but also as we look ahead on the long road we still have ahead of us.

 

I know of course that I do not have to explain to anyone here today the power of photography and the role photojournalism played during the civil rights movement. It was the power of photographs- depicting the fire hoses, the dogs jumping on young people because they were standing up to inequality, the aggressive policemen with their clubs, that moved and motivated people around the nation to finally stand up in the 1960s and create a movement and put a stop to systemic segregation and discrimination.

 

We owe it to photographic journalism for truly igniting the civil rights movement. Seeing photos of Rosa Parks as Mr. Cravens captured; and seeing the photos we have all seen of the Montgomery Boycott and the 1963 March on Washington along with the iconic photo of Martin Luther King delivering his historic speech, to name a few- these are some of the visual aids that have had such a profound effect on so many Americans and enabled the African-American community to propel us towards progress and equal justice. These are the photos that ultimately encouraged African-Americans to leave their homes and march in Selma; these are the photos that touched the lives of countless other advocates and allies who were called to join in this movement, fighting for equality so that all in could have access to the American dream; housing, equal opportunity, and justice under the law. These are the photos that turned anti-discrimination sentiments into a national movement leading to landmark civil rights legislation.

 

Photography was such a precious and valuable tool for photojournalists in the 60s that made the movement what it was, and our youth see this potential and continue to build on it today.

 

But unlike the 1960s, in an era when photography has become an inseparable part of our lives, and accessible to all, it is criticial today that we reflect on photojournalism’s moral and political significance. After all, with so many photos and visuals bombarding us each day, it is important to make a clear distinction between the distractions and the true works of art that compel us.

 

Kiana Escobedo, Andy Villatero, Lonnie Johnson, Rian Rollins, and Bryce Taylor are part of a new generation of leaders who are invigorating a wave of change into our society. They are doing what our civil rights leaders took part in decades ago and what Donald Craven and Alfonso Murray have done all their lives: taking visual record of our nation’s most precious moments for all to bear witness. Not only are their photographs inspiring works of art that will stand the test of time, but they will work to alert millions of Americans to what’s happening in our neighboring towns, cities, and states. These students offer refreshing reminders on the current conditions of our society and motivate people of every race and color to stand up in the face of injustice and take real action.

 

Beyond the masterpieces we see before us in this museum, most of us now bear the ability to capture a photograph or video with the click of a button on our smartphones and the ability to immediately publish content online for millions to see. As such, Americans from coast to coast are witnessing a constant stream of the discrimination African-Americans face in cities from Long Island New York and Detroit to Ferguson. The work of our aspiring high school students, the work of artists like Mr. Cravens and Mr. Murray, and the work of thousands across our nation who capture events once impossible to catch have created a new wave of momentum- the Black Lives Matter movement.

 

In fact, this movement owes its very existence to the many intimate videos published online for the world to see. Today, it takes less than a second to film or photograph some of the atrocities occurring around us. Trayvon Martin, Eric Gardner, Tamir Rice, Ezell Ford, and Sandra Bland- these are five innocent, precious lives lost too soon, and deaths that would have gone utterly unnoticed had we not had the ability to capture their perpetrator’s severe crimes. We are experiencing a new level of heightened awareness that is changing our political discourse and igniting new change.

 

Last year I hosted the mothers of Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Eric Gardner, Tamir Rice and Ezell Ford, and was reminded of the outrage, pain, and suffering of black discrimination. The visual documentation of their children bring to mind the historic photo of Emmet Till’s open casket, the teenager who was brutally beaten and mutilated by two white men in the South, and redirected attention to the rights of blacks in the South.

 

Today, we are redirecting modern atrocities into meaningful change, though far too often we forget these events should spark healing, not pain and despair. I continuously feel the power of these mothers ripple into our communities and promote the infliction of real change and action within our government and society. It is this power of healing that we must harvest into real, constructive, progress, so that our futures don’t uphold the same values and bigotry we faced in our history and continue to experience today.

 

So I close with a final message to our students, to keep fostering their passion of the creative arts and continue inspiring their audience to stand up for our American brothers and sisters and contribute to a future that encourages equality and opportunity for each and every American.

 

I would now like to welcome Jarvis Crawford from the Black History Committee. Thank you.

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A PROLONGED ABSENCE OF WATER, and MR. BENTLEY

bernardhoyes

Syncona Mesa RainbowThe Absence of mr. Bentley is going on a year. Our fears was stronger that his. We fared for his survival while he was busy taking care of his with adapting. There is a thing as” call of the wild”. It’s the acclimatization of the senses to the immediate surroundings.

Bentley(La)

Bently had adjusted. He had defined his territory around Syncona.  In the Mornings,  we would let him out to explore and signify.

He had his spots to piss. With the grounds so large he would divide the task into sessions. There was the attack on the selected Bushes. Bushes that he would not venture into, but had to announce his presence.  He knew whomever is in there, beware, I have this area covered, clear out.                                                      …

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A PROLONGED ABSENCE OF WATER, and MR. BENTLEY

Syncona Mesa RainbowThe Absence of mr. Bentley is going on a year. Our fears was stronger that his. We fared for his survival while he was busy taking care of his with adapting. There is a thing as” call of the wild”. It’s the acclimatization of the senses to the immediate surroundings.

Bentley(La)

Bently had adjusted. He had defined his territory around Syncona.  In the Mornings,  we would let him out to explore and signify.

He had his spots to piss. With the grounds so large he would divide the task into sessions. There was the attack on the selected Bushes. Bushes that he would not venture into, but had to announce his presence.  He knew whomever is in there, beware, I have this area covered, clear out.                                                             Bentley(1)

The wild Dogs, he would take them on. drive them to the edge of the property as a border collie would handle sheep. He would not only herd them from both sides but confound them by circling thru their legs. It was amazing to us to witness, while at the same time in fear for his life.

There was the rub. With LaVera leading the single member chorus of trepidation, every time for a walk was a time of anxiety. After a couple of late nite run in with coyote, I out fitted her with a 9mm Beretta. Small, have 8 round with a holster and belt. She was fearless with him on a leash and packing. Only he was never satisfied with his walks with her. It was never in exploit, there was no territorial mapping, no adventure.

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He would come in, still looking back thru the window, then looking at me, waiting for me to say “come on” then unleash him on the grounds. He would rush out in full gallop heading out into the mesa. Be it day or night it was the same Geronimo yelp as he attack the selected bushes.

Mr. Bentley reverted to his natural nature just after one year in this reasonable Wild Mesa, I call, Syncona. I read some where that his breed were rodent hunters. Sure enough, he had an instinct for stalking Rats and Lizards. That stand off with the Bobcat over the carcass of a Jack Rabbit, was a serious regress.Featured Image -- 216

LaVera enjoyed hunting with him, it gave her that excitement that she misses after living in L.A. She began to give him leads to their whereabouts. Other than the rats being Rats, they eat the eggs of the CooDoves, her Peeps, which made them her arch-enemy. After awhile, he began to refuse house and Dog food. Pieces of lizards and Rats on the Patio was alarming. Turned out some of the Lizards were endangered.Attachment-1

He knew his limitations though. The Red Racer that comes around, he manages to alert us and Run when he has to. Like that night when he took on the Coyote, to only realize, he was in over his head, and retreated to my heels. Two other time he had encounters. Both time in the light of the Day. Once, LaVera fired off a round. The other, three Coyote had them surrounded, she wasnt armed but mustered some bravado to confront them.  Realizing they were outnumbered,  She stood in the Path of the one closest, and in her biggest voice told Mr. Bentley to run home, which he did.

He was constantly getting dehydrated. Had a couple of near death experience. His symptoms would be a swollen stomach, hard like a rock, with listlessness. Massaging his stomach while dropping distilled water mixed with fresh blended Aloe Vera in his mouth worked to revive him. Each time he had a quick recovery, but we wondered just how much the experience weakened him.

hornback rattler

Once he came up lost. For a whole two days he was nowhere to be found. called on the neighbours on the Mesa. there are five houses only three are occupied all year around. No one had seen him for days. He would wander off on occasion over to the Closest neighbour to visit Adrian, the Doberman. They had a friendship that intensified into a serious affair with Adrian in heat. Our thoughts were they ran off together. But we had already call their bluff by getting them together. Adrian a good two feet taller than Mr. Bentley made is impossible to satisfy their intentions. So the next scenario was that he was stolen, then, the Coyotes finally got him.

At the beginning of the third day I went into the Garage to go through some Boxes. The Back story on this is that we recently moved. A majority of the unpacked Boxes are stored to the ceiling in the garage, ever so often I go in and unpack a few. This day, my back was feeling well, so to take my mind off Bent,  I started to unpack some boxes. There he was, happy to see me, shaken and weak. those three days with the average temperature being 105 he has been locked away, no food or water, took a lot out of him.

Good thing I had installed a evaporative cooler to keep the garage, now a Storage for my Published works on Paper, Paintings and Boxes from the Studio in Los Angeles, Tempered. We had already given him up for dead. Made our peace with his Spirit. Even burned a Candle and read and recited Psalm 91.20140422-233258.jpg

The next phase was to get him to a safe and secure place where he can be looked after with love. We found such a place with a neighbour on the same street we had live on for 35 years. Someone he knew and who loved him.  She agreed to adopt him before, but the deal fell through when she wanted to have him fixed. Didn’t want to interfer with his Personea. The complete Dog that is Mr. Bentley, survived for two years on Syncona, because his nature prevailed intact. This time, the option was more appealing, only to ensure his perlonged survival.

ART PERFORMANCE at the PALM SPRING ART MUSEUM

Thursday, February 12, 4-6 p.m.

Bernard Hoyes will demonstrate mono printing with

his “Rag Series” technique.

When Bernard Stanley Hoyes paints, we listen. Yes listen, because his work calls to our inner spirit, piercing spaces deep within, beckoning us to worlds and regions holy, sacred and sanctified. A creator of art, symbols and ancestral echoes, this Jamaican native possesses the power to make colors, forms, and dance, and leap, shout and vibrate on a variety of surfaces. Ancient becomes contemporary, ceremonies rings eternal and traditions manifests as new revelations.

And so it is with Hoyes. His paintings call to us, speak to us, whisper to us. The life force pulses through them. A true product of his environment, Hoyes art for the past thirty years pays significant homage to Jamaican revival culture and the backyard religions he knew as a child. As he mines the traditions of an old and complex culture, he lays it before us like a feast.

His celebration of traditional African religions has found universal appeal, stunning audiences worldwide with their depth and compelling lure. It is no wonder that Oprah Winfrey, Natalie Cole, Richard Pryor, Capital Records and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture are all amongst his collectors.

My images stand as praise to our existence, past, present and future. My challenge is to master unique compositions of spiritual significance. I desire to visually engross the viewer through powerful expressive works.

I have been painting from an intuitive point of view. During this process, the spirits take possession and ritual themes have become dominant. The common denominator has been expressions in the Painting medium. My concern with spiritual testimony, using Contemporary expressions has been the driving force that eventually established a visual voice. Of late, the works has gotten transformative.

Proof being, bringing a selection of the Revival Series Paintings to life on Stage, as an Interdisciplinary creative force, using Visual Arts, Video, Dance, African Traditional Drums and Voices as a production titled, “Se7en Paintings, a Story in Performance”. Seven of my most iconic paintings came to life on the Ford Amphitheater Stage in Los Angeles in 2012.

This was the first step into the Interdisciplinary field. New insights in my application of the Painting discipline have since emerged.

The Modernist discourse in my Paintings has evolved. Raw Materials, technology, and raw textures have appeared. Templates harkening back to the Rag Series from the 70’s, when Raw materials and graphics were prevalent in my exploration.

I am still coming from an intuitive point of view, using traditional mediums, to a unified science of all that went before, Into new methods, including neglected concepts and synthesis of varied consciousness.

Hoyes past works is vividly displayed on his website, at www.berndhoyes.com.

Impression Plate In a Rag Mood L1080007 L1080020 IMG_4892 bh-Rags on the Horizon, aCivilization in my Past Skipping Rag HoyesReview-Under the Net-Rag Series IMG_4918 L1003288 L1003322 P1000905 P1000902 P1000896 P1000912 bh-Rag-Birthin

Bernard Stanley Hoyes Spirit of the Land Show

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“Desertscapes Series”

 
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Watercolor

 
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Each 33×23″

***

You are cordially invited to a special event in our gallery space.

An artist reception for

Bernard Stanley Hoyes

Spirit of the Land Show

Friday, April 3rd, 4-8 P.M.

***

  • Helene Galen, board member of the Palm Springs Art Museum and namesake of the Palm Springs Museum at Palm Desert, introduced Bernard Hoyes to the Coachella Valley this past February at the Palm Springs Art Museum in a group show featuring his artwork. Now Desert Art Collection is introducing him to our patrons and collectors by hosting a show of his watercolor desertscapes the month of April.

Although known throughout the world, very few collectors are aware that 

Bernard Hoyes does wonderful watercolors. Since moving to the Coachella Valley as his permanent residence last year, he has been working on a special series of paintings “Spirit of the Land”. Painted from an intuitive point of view, these works are a unique perspective of life and landscape of the desert. Some of the watercolors are very large format pieces and perfect for the large desert homes in the Coachella Valley. Others are what people usually consider medium and large scale works.

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“Winter Clouds Embrace San Gorgonio”, Watercolor, 33×23″

“This show is about my impressions of the land (Coachella Valley), flora and fauna bone dry under the spell of recent drought. Being the sole guest for many stellar events, my tentacles are ever grasping to possess the vistas that avail themselves. I am in permanent observation…exposed to the natural changes of the seasons.”

“I took a direct and intuitive approach in rendering the spirit of the land. My emphasis is on contemplation of nature and its offering of spiritual satisfaction. The compositions are more suggestive and less descriptive. I relied on the controlled recession of details through plane after plane, allowing the observer to wander across into the picture space in a kind of vicarious experience of nature. These works have been my meditation.”

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“Cacti Rose in Bloom Competes with the Majesty of a Youthful Mesquite”, Watercolor, 33×23″

 
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The Sanctuary of this Corner, in the Shade of a Creosote, Uncertainty Lurking Beyond”, Watercolor, 33×23″

American, born in Jamaica, Hoyes earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts in painting and graphic design from the California School of Arts and Crafts in Oakland, California, after attending the Vermont Academy, the Art Students League in New York (under a Ford Foundation Scholarship) and the Jamaica Institute. He apprenticed under the established artists Norman Lewis, Huie Lee Smith and John Torres.

Best known for his recognition and affirmation of traditional African religion and spirituality and its influence in the Western world in his “Rag” and “Revival Series”, he also has suites of works called “Jazz Series” and the “Personages”. Regardless of the genre, all the work has an undercurrent of spirituality.

Throughout his career, Bernard has been committed to the public good as evidenced by his mural works in Los Angeles and other special projects such as the African Methodist Episcopal’s In the Spirit of Contribution which employed youth from the community. He has a long list of commendations from the city of Los Angeles.

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“View of Desert Hot Springs”, Watercolor, 33×23″

Mr. Hoyes has attracted collectors and patrons world-wide including Oprah Winfrey, Natalie Cole, Steve Harvey and the National Urban League.

A reception for Mr. Hoyes will be held during the 1st Friday El Paseo Artwalk on Friday, April 3rd, from 4-8 P.M. Desert Art Collection is located at 45-350 San Luis Rey Ave. at El Paseo in Palm Desert. Desert Art Collection hours are: Monday-Saturday 10-5 and Sunday 11-4. For more information call 760/674-9955 or go to www.desertartcollection.com.

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“Phoenix Skies” (Cabot Lodge), Large format watercolor, 60×40″

GRAPHICS

45-350 San Luis Rey Ave at El Paseo (across Pacific Premier Bank)

Palm Desert, CA 92260

760/674-9955

Hours: Mon-Sat 10-5, Sun 11-4, First Fridays Artwalk 4-8

Desert Art Collection

Tribal Artifacts

Lotus Garden Center

Southern California Energy

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New Works by BERNARD STANLEY HOYES

bernardhoyes

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SYNCONA MESA, my sanctuary, watercolor impressions of the Land, the flora and fauna, bone dry, and under the spell of recent drought. Being the sole guest for many stellar events, My tentacles are ever grasping, to possess the interaction of the live vistas that avail themselves. Seems I am in permanent observation, exposed to the natural changes of the Seasons.

"On the Syncona Mesa, Coyotes are resident Guardens." 23x33" by Bernard Stanley Hoyes “On the Syncona Mesa, Coyotes are resident Guardens.” 23×33″ by Bernard Stanley Hoyes

Syncona Mesa Rainbow

“I took a direct and intuitive approach in rendering the spirit of the Land. My emphasis is on contemplation of Nature and its offering of Spiritual Satisfaction. The compositions are more suggestive and less descriptive. I relied on the controlled recession of details through plane after plane, allowing the observer to wander across, into the picture space , in a kind of vicarious experience of Nature. These works have been my meditation”

"Peaceful evening on Syncona Mesa" 12x16" watercolor by Bernard Stanley Hoyes “Peaceful evening on Syncona Mesa”…

View original post 6 more words

New Works by BERNARD STANLEY HOYES

2JD212F

SYNCONA MESA, my sanctuary, watercolor impressions of the Land, the flora and fauna, bone dry, and under the spell of recent drought. Being the sole guest for many stellar events, My tentacles are ever grasping, to possess the interaction of the live vistas that avail themselves. Seems I am in permanent observation, exposed to the natural changes of the Seasons.

"On the Syncona Mesa, Coyotes are resident Guardens." 23x33" by Bernard Stanley Hoyes
“On the Syncona Mesa, Coyotes are resident Guardens.” 23×33″ by Bernard Stanley Hoyes

Syncona Mesa Rainbow

“I took a direct and intuitive approach in rendering the spirit of the Land. My emphasis is on contemplation of Nature and its offering of Spiritual Satisfaction. The compositions are more suggestive and less descriptive. I relied on the controlled recession of details through plane after plane, allowing the observer to wander across, into the picture space , in a kind of vicarious experience of Nature. These works have been my meditation”

"Peaceful evening on Syncona Mesa" 12x16" watercolor by Bernard Stanley Hoyes
“Peaceful evening on Syncona Mesa” 12×16″ watercolor by Bernard Stanley Hoyes